3/16/2007

bite the sand

Bite the sand In the face of unruly behaviour, Singapore might as well bite the sand, or bullet, and stop all importing of sand and granite from Indonesia. Go for new sources, pay a bit more, slow down a little in the pace of construction, spread them out by a year or two especially those projects that are not really that urgent. This will do a lot of good to relations in both countries.

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

New sources? I hope you do not mean from smugglers.

redbean said...

hahaha.

i god fearing and always pray to god. so no corruption thoughts : ) this applies to all those who also pray to god. all incorrptible.

Matilah_Singapura said...

The sg gov is a force to be reckoned with. Whilst I believe that they are are too powerful and need constant "regulation" by We, The People, at least they sometimes "get it right".

They've handled the situation very calmly and cooly, IMO—always leaving space for the Indons to gracefully back out and not lose face. It is a shame that the Indon govt hasn't taken up this option, which to my knowledge still remains open.

With no hinterland so supply what most people understand as natural resources, S'pore has to import virtually everything it uses to build the structures and infrastructures on the island.

Anyone with half a brain know that this means a vulnerability to "supply shocks". And the same half-wit could probably also reason that this being the case, it is WISE to have stockpiles of the stuff you know you'll need, but could have supplies disrupted.

Well, the sg.govt called the right shot and stockpiled sand. This is similar to what Brit PM Maggie Thatcher did to bust the coalminers unions—she quietly stockpiled coal so that the Brits could have warmth in winter and electricity.

No need to "smuggle" lah. Can do this legally.

All you do is register a company (or a chain of companies to create a "web") in another (neutral) territory—like Brunei—and then buy Indon sand and granite as a (say) Brunei registered company, shuffle the paper and bills of lading around other companies, and finally ship the goods to S'pore.

No trade embargo can withstand free-market forces for very long. In fact, no one can exert permanent control on any spontaneous order. Nature doesn't like to be "controlled"—especially by the arrogance and temerity of Man.

redbean said...

leave it to the ingenuity of man and trade will flow. there are many permutations and options. it is basically a matter of price between a willing buyer and a willing seller.

the buyer will do his economics. so will the seller.

unfortunately the indons cannot see this and the arithmetic short circuited their brain cells. they can only think of 'i take' or 'i dictate.'

the sale of water from malaysia is the best example for all to learn. they also want to dictate the price. now what? in years to come, when alternative cheaper sources can be obtained, they will have to let their water flow into the sea, for free. no buyers.

the sand issue, it hurts both parties. the worst hit will be the innocent sand quarry workers who need work to bring back the food for the family. thousands of them are now jobless with this stupidity.

Matilah_Singapura said...

> the sand issue, it hurts both parties. the worst hit will be the innocent sand quarry workers who need work to bring back the food for the family. thousands of them are now jobless with this stupidity.<

Please have some journalistic integrity lah! And tell the WHOLE truth.

This is what happens to the the "common man" when states create themselves monopolies in the political and commercial sectors, and therefore states should be BANNED from doing business altogether–by FORCE if necessary.

redbean said...

the problems here is a bit complicated. when one cannot differentiate between state and pirates.