12/09/2008

Myth 199 - Fallen myths

Two big myths have fallen. The myth of paying big money for top talents is now a myth that will circulate in cocktail parties as a joke. All the supertalents in top American financial institutions and giant corporations, including the motor companies are laughing stocks. Paying them millions and millions and what did the shareholders get? Bankrupt companies. Oh, hold it a minute. The companies could be worst off if not because of their talents. And in times like these, their talents are even more needed. The second big myth to bite the dust is big names, reputations and track records. All the big American financial institutions are big names with proven track records, plus supertalents, tested and proven. What happened? An organisation is as good as the people running it. The people running an organisation now are not the same people who built them. Or if some are still around, the mission, priorities and values may have changed. Don't be complacent. Count ourselves lucky not to have employed these great talents at cloud nine salaries. Or are we thinking of picking them up now that they are losing their jobs?

13 comments:

Anonymous said...

Top talents when enticed by money look after their own pockets first. Any greater good or benefits are incidental.

redbean said...

not necessarily true. you put them through a thorough psychiatric test to filter out the greedy and the pretenders, then you will get the good and real ones, the selfless ones.

Anonymous said...

The truth is, there are serious problems in Singapore right now.

Francis Chua, Singapore

Anonymous said...

would the employment situation which we will soon face be less severe for the local born and bred were we not been too liberal and aggressive in letting in foreign workers, from clerks to managers or everybody in the first place? beyond saying that singaporeans will be last to be retrenched, what else could be done? should the jobs of the pink ic holders even be protected in the meritocratic workplace? a penny for your tots..

Anonymous said...

>a penny for your tots..

On another corner of the Singapore island, are the rich Singaporeans who have savings that will sustain them for many more good years to come.

Francis Chua, Singapore

Anonymous said...

And not forgeting the many charities with many years of reserve money donated by kind members of the public.

Francis Chua, Singapore

Anonymous said...

The saddest cases were those in Singapore whose money had totally ran out.

The government refused to give out financial aid. Their family and friends are unable to help them financially. They have no jobs.

They suffered in silence, their human rights totally violated by the dictatorial government in Singapore with controlled media that refused to report news of the desperate poor.

With the last bit of money they had, they bought their kids their last meals they can afford to, bade them goodbyes with sad eyes.

Downcast, they walked to the nearest MRT (subway) station, bought a one way ticket, went to the train platform, waited for an oncoming train, with their mind totally blank, their future gone, and at the moment when the speeding train approached, they jumped onto the railway track. The train ran over their bodies.

That were the end of their sad lives.

May their extremely tired body and mind rest in peace.

This is the part of Singapore, Singapore news media censored.

The facts: there were several subway train suicides in the last couples of years in Singapore.

Francis Chua, Singapore

redbean said...

in times like this, we should not exaggerate on the bad cases. it will create a wrong feeling of despair.

Anonymous said...

>in times like this, we should not exaggerate on the bad cases. it will create a wrong feeling of despair.

There is never a good time to report on their plight. In good times, they were ignored by the rich. They are deemed as economically unimportant. After their suicides, the Singapore news media sensationalised their deaths to boast their circulations. The news media were severely criticised but the criticism were never reported.

There is no human rights in Singapore. It is horrible living in Singapore.

Francis Chua, Singapore

Anonymous said...

When the poor in Singapore break the secular laws, thus commit crimes, they are punished severely. But when the rich commit crimes, they are not punish severely. More often than not, the crimes committed by the rich go unreported and are covered up by the rich themselves.

This is the state of natural justice in Singapore.

Francis Chua, Singapore

redbean said...

francis, you should read the press today. walter woon has explained clearly that what you perceived is wrong.

Anonymous said...

>francis, you should read the press today. walter woon has explained clearly that what you perceived is wrong.

Please read the news again, there was one line that went "composition, by its nature, favours the people who can afford to pay".

Francis Chua, Singapore

redbean said...

: )