8/20/2008

Some still disagree with Hsien Loong's liberalisation

The ink is still wet, or the sound of clapping is still reverberating in the ears, and we are hearing the old message again. Hsien Loong has given the go ahead for netizens to blog about politics, even race and religion as long as they are treated respectfully. Now Baey Yam Keng is saying that bloggers reporting on govt issues should be regulated like traditional media. Did he attend Hsien Loong's rally? What is more ludicrous is that he waved the flag of objectivity and responsible reporting as the outstanding trademarks of traditional media when traditional media was not only bashed in cyberspace for its stupidity and highly biased reporting recently. What kind of objectivity are we talking about? And responsible to who? He added that the regulating of bloggers could happen in the future, but not now as the govt would not be comfortable. Is this the confidential thinking of the govt and regulation is only a matter of timing? Maybe it is only a personal view. Lam Pin Min 'was "not aversed" to credible bloggers covering press conferences to engage them in feedback.'

8 comments:

Anonymous said...

Read carefully the context for Mr Baey's comment. He was referring to press accreditation for bloggers to gain access to government press conferences to cover the news.

http://www.todayonline.com/articles/271861.asp

SUBHD: Press accreditation for bloggers?
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Could such participation go a step further to include news reporting?
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Last month, the Malaysian Government issued press passes to about 10 online news sites such as Malaysiakini, but stopped short of handing them out to bloggers since blogs are often personal in nature.
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Press passes would allow bloggers access to Government briefings or press conferences, for example, and the access to speak to officials at these events.

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But one concern among commentators is credibility and accuracy – bloggers, after all, would largely not have journalistic training and their writing would not be subject to the editing process of the traditional media.
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EastCoastLife said most bloggers at the preview of the MCYS commercial “weren’t prepared and not active in responding. There were many questions to be asked, but they let slip the opportunity.” Most bloggers, she felt, are not ready to be responsible.
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Associate Professor Ang Peng Hwa of Nanyang Technological University’s communications programme: “Unless they are prepared to have themselves held accountable (for their writing), I don’t see how bloggers can equate themselves with professional media.”
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Member of Parliament (MP) Baey Yam Keng said blogsites that report on government issues should be regulated like traditional media, “to establish the same quality of objective and responsible reporting”.
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“I think it (bloggers reporting) could happen in the future, but looking at the state of the blogsphere now, I think the Government would not be comfortable,” he said.
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Still, fellow MP Lam Pin Min was “not averse” to credible bloggers covering press conferences as it would “be a positive step” towards harnessing blogs to put out information, “engage and solicit feedback from the public”.

redbean said...

the topic was bloggers being invited to cover govt press interviews. but baey was talking about blogs reporting on govt issues in general. and on this matter, objectivity is not dictated by professional training or professionalism.

factual reporting is not a messy or complicated stuff. it is the views and opinions of the reporters that are in question. and the objectivity is often dependent on the private agenda or vested interest of the person reporting.

professional journalists have been very prevalent in twisting facts and views to suit their agenda and thrown objectivity out of the window.

Anonymous said...

Those who stand to benefit from the regime will only speak for the regime. It is human nature to be self-interest.

Anonymous said...

"Unless they are prepared to have themselves held accountable (for their writing), I don’t see how bloggers can equate themselves with professional media.”"

Are the professional media accountable to their own professionalism when they just only regurgitate what the emperor and his retard son vomits ? Maybe Singapore of professionalism means not to question, not to have critical thinking, and subject to propaganda.

How can elite talk about professionalism and flatten themselves when in the world ranking, our ranking of freedom of press is so pathetic and dismay ?

Really Uniquely Singapore ! God save the emperor and his moronic son !

Anonymous said...

For more detailed discussions on this important topic, see:
http://forums.delphiforums.com/sunkopitiam/messages?msg=1135.1

Singapore Kopitiam:
http://forums.delphiforums.com/sunkopitiam/messages/

Anonymous said...

For more detailed discussions on this important topic, see:
http://forums.delphiforums.com/sunkopitiam/messages?msg=1135.1


Singapore Kopitiam:
http://forums.delphiforums.com/sunkopitiam/messages/

redbean said...

the old sbf has splitted into several groups. now we have the otak stall and singapore kopitiam.

this will add two more sites for bloggers to visit.

cheers.

redbean said...

hi all,

we should not be misled or be abused by people who denounced us as being not responsible or accountable to our postings. don't bet on it that we may post under a pseudonym, our identities are no secret. if we cross the line we can be hauled up, we can be sued for defamation and all that zest.

we should post responsibly and rationally. that is our only protection. we should be as professional as the professionals, if not better.